Editor'S Choice

Sears, Roebuck and Company

Sears, Roebuck and Company

In 1886, Richard Sears bought an unwanted shipment of gold watches from a Chicago jewelry shop. After some time working together, they decided to start a company by the name of Sears, Roebuck and Co.Sears observed that farmers paid high prices for many of the products they consumed from local merchants.

Fragment of Urartian Horse Harness

Fragment of Urartian Horse Harness

This bronze plaque is engraved, at the upper part, with a figure of a god in a winged sun-disc. Originally, this plaque was part of a horse-harness (side-piece ), which was stitched to a leather backing...

Head of an Apkallu from Nimrud

Head of an Apkallu from Nimrud

Fragment of an alabaster bas-relief depicting a head of a human-headed Apkallu wearing a horned helmet. From the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), Mesopotamia, modern-day...

USS Salem CS-3 - History

USS Salem CS-3 - History

USS Salem CS-3 Salem(Scout Cruiser No. 3: dp. 3,750; 1. 423& 39;2& 34;; b. 47& 39;1& 34;dr. 18& 39;9& 34;; s. 24 k., cpl. 359; a. 2 5& 34;, 6 3& 34;, 2 21& 34; tt.,cl. Chester)The first Salem, Scout Cruiser No. 3, was laid down on 28 August 1905 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Co. Quincy, Mass., launched on 27 July 1907, sponsored by Mrs.

Side view of Takao Class Cruiser

Side view of Takao Class Cruiser

Side view of Takao Class Cruiser Here we see a side view of a Takao class cruiser, with all of her five main gun turrets pointing away from the camera. This view shows us the overall layout of the class, with a sloping forward smokestack and most of the superstructure concentrated around the bridge area.

Maryport Temple, the most Norse temple in the Roman world

Maryport Temple, the most Norse temple in the Roman world

An archaeological excavation team led by Professor Ian Haynes and Tony Wilmot has uncovered layers over the past six weeks in order to better understand the environment in which the internationally famous Maryport altars were arranged in Roman times. It is the third year of a five year excavation program commissioned by the Senhouse Trust Museum with the support of Newcastle University and the permission of the Adrian Wall Trust land owners.