Boyd DD- 544 - History

Boyd DD- 544 - History


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Boyd

Joseph Boyd enlisted in the Navy 4 April 1803 as a steward. On 16 February 1804 he took part in the expedition which burned Philadelphia following her capture by the Tripolitanians. Boyd later became a clerk.

(DD-544: dp. 2050; 1. 376'5"; b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9"; s. 35 k.;
cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 21" TT.; cl. Fletcher)

Boyd (DD-544) was launched 29 October 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro, Calif.; sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Styer, wife of Captain Styer; and commissioned 8 May 1943, Lieutenant Communder U. S. G. Sharp in com in and.

As a unit of the Pacific Fleet, Boyd departed for Pearl Harbor 14 July 1943. After additional training she took part in the occupation of Baker Island (1 September 1943) and then joined the fast carriers as a screening vessel for the Wake Island raid (5-6 October) and the Gilbert Islands landings (19 November 8 December). During the bombardment of Nauru Island (8 December) Boyd was damaged by a Japanese shore battery while on a rescue mission. As a result she had to return to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, for repairs.

Following repairs Boyd arrived at Pearl Harbor 23 March 1944. She joined TF 58 for the Hollandia landings (21-24 April) ; Truk-Satawan-Ponape raid (29 April-I May) ; Saipan landings (11-24 June) ; 1st Bonins raid (15-16 June) ; Battle of the Philippine Sea (19-20 June) - 2d Bonins raid (24 June) ; 3d Bonins raid (3-4 July,

invasion of Guam (12 July-15 August) ; Palau-Yap-Ulithk raid (25-27 July) ; 4th Bonins raid (4-5 August) occupation of the southern Palaus (9-24 September) and Morotal landings (15 September). She then joined TF 38 for the strikes against Okinawa (10 October), northern Luzon and Formosa (11-14 October), and Luzon (15 October), which preceded the Leyte landings. After taking part in the Battle for Leyte Gulf (24-25 October), she screened the carriers launching strikes against Luzon (5-6, 13-14, and 19-25 November).

Between 31 December 1944 and 22 January 1945 Boyd served as an escort vessel. She then took part in the 24 January 1945 bombardment of Iwo Jima and in the occupation of the Island (19 February-1 March). She arrived off Okinawa 25 March and remained there on screening duty until 30 June. She then rejoined the 3rd Fleet for strikes against the Japanese home islands (10 July-7 August). One of the first vessels t9 return to the United States after the Japanese surrender, Boyd departed Okinawa 7 September and underwent overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard (25 September-28 November). She then moved to San Diego, arriving 14 January 1946, and was placed out of commission In reserve 15 January 1947.

Recommissioned 24 November 1950, the destroyer reported to the Pacific Fleet. Following training off the west coast, Boyd departed for Korea 28 May 1951. She remained there, serving with TF 77 and on the Formosa Strait Patrol, until returning to San Diego 21 December 1951. Boyd departed San Diego 12 July 1952 for her second Korean tour. She served on the Wonsan blockade and took part In the amphibious demonstration off Kojo (6-15 October). She departed Korean waters In late January and arrived at San Diego 16 February 1953. Since the end of the Korean fighting Boyd has continued operations along the west coast and has made three Far Eastern tours.

Boyd received 11 battle stars.


BOYD DD 544

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Fletcher Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid April 2 1942 - Launched October 29 1942

Struck from Naval Register October 1 1969

Naval Covers

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Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Boyd (DD 544)

Decommissioned 15 January 1947.
Recommissioned 24 November 1950.
Decommissioned and stricken on 1 October 1969.
Transferred to Turkey on 1 October 1969 being renamed Iskenderun.
Iskenderun was stricken and scrapped in 1981.

Commands listed for USS Boyd (DD 544)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Ulysses Simpson Grant Sharp, Jr., USN8 May 194310 Nov 1944
2T/Cdr. Archibald Egerton Teall, USN10 Nov 1944

You can help improve our commands section
Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.

Notable events involving Boyd include:

19 Jan 1945
USS Balao (Cdr. M.R. de Arellano, USN) ended her 7th war patrol at Guam. She was escorted in by USS Boyd.

At Guam she was refitted by Submarine Division 282 Relief crew and the USS Apollo. Refit was completed on 3 February 1945. Training was carried out during 8 to 19 February 1945.

Media links


USS Boyd DD-544 (1943-1969)

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DD-544 Boyd

Boyd (DD-544) was laid down 2 April 1942, launched 29 October 1942 by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro Calif., sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Styer, wife of Captain Styer, and commissioned 8 May 1943, Lieutenant Commander U. S. G. Sharp in command.

As a unit of the Pacific Fleet, Boyd departed for Pearl Harbor 14 July 1943. After additional training she took part in the occupation of Baker Island (1 September 1943) and then joined the fast carriers as a screening vessel for the Wake Island raid (5-6 October) and the Gilbert Islands landings (19 November-8 December). During the bombardment of Nauru Island (8 December) Boyd was damaged by a Japanese shore battery while on a rescue mission. As a result she had to return to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, for repairs.

Following repairs Boyd arrived at Pearl Harbor 23 March 1944. She Joined TF 58 for the Hollandia landings (21-24 April) Truk-Satawan-Ponape raid (29 April-1 May) Saipan landings (11-24 June) 1st Bonins raid ( 15-16 June) Battle of the Philippine Sea (19-20 June) 2d Bonins raid (24 June) 3d Bonins raid (3-4 July) invasion of Guam (12 July-15 August) Palau-Yap-Ulithi, raid (25-27 July) 4th Bonins raid (4-5 August) occupation of the southern Palaus (9-24 September), and Morotai landings (15 September). She then joined TF 38 for the strikes against Okinawa (10 October), northern Luzon and Formosa (11-14 October), and Luzon (15 October), which preceded the Leyte landings. After taking part in the Battle for Leyte Gulf (24-25 October) she screened the carriers launching strikes against Luzon (5-6, 13-14, and 19-25 November).

Between 31 December 1944 and 22 January 1945 Boyd served as an escort vessel. She then took part in the 24 January 1945 bombardment of Iwo Jima and in the occupation of the island (19 February-1 March). She arrived off Okinawa 95 March and remained there on screening duty until 30 June. She then rejoined the 3rd Fleet for strikes against the Japanese home islands (10 July-7 August). One of the first vessels to return to the United States after the Japanese surrender, Boyd departed Okinawa 7 September and underwent overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard (25 September-28 November). She then moved to San Diego, arriving 14 January 1948 and was placed out of commission in reserve 15 January 1947.

Recommissioned 24 November 1950, the destroyer reported to the Pacific Fleet. Following training off the west coast, Boyd departed for Korea 28 May 1951. She remained there, serving with TF 77 and on the Formosa Strait Patrol, until returning to San Diego 21 December 1951. Boyd departed San Diego 12 July 1952 for her second Korean tour. She served on the Wonsan blockade and took part in the amphibious demonstration off Kojo (6-15 October). She departed Korean waters in late January and arrived at San Diego 16 February 1953. Since the end of the Korean fighting Boyd has continued operations along the west coast and has made three Far Eastern tours. She was decommissioned and stricken 1 October 1969, and sold to Turkey the same day. Renamed Iskenderun, she served the Turkish Navy until stricken and scrapped in 1981.

Boyd received 11 battle stars for World War II and five for her Korean service.


Boyd DD- 544 - History

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Boyd DD 544 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Bangkok, Hong Kong, Subic Bay and Manila Philippines, Kaohsiung Formosa China, Okinawa Sasebo and Yokosuka Japan, Midway Island, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and San Francisco.
  • Crew Roster (Name Rank) Sorted by Hometown State
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 293 Photos on Approximately 50 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.


Mục lục

Boyd được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bethlehem Steel Co. ở San Pedro, California vào ngày 2 tháng 4 năm 1942. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 29 tháng 10 năm 1942 được đỡ đầu bởi bà C. W. Styer và nhập biên chế vào ngày 8 tháng 5 năm 1943 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân Ulysses S. G. Sharp, Jr..

1943 Sửa đổi

Gia nhập Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương, Boyd khởi hành đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 14 tháng 7 năm 1943. Sau những lượt huấn luyện bổ sung, nó tham gia hoạt động chiếm đóng đảo Baker vào ngày 1 tháng 9, rồi gia nhập lực lượng đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay nhanh trong vai trò tàu hộ tống cho đợt tấn công lên đảo Wake trong các ngày 5 và 6 tháng 10, cũng như trong cuộc đổ bộ lên quần đảo Gilbert từ ngày 19 tháng 11 đến ngày 8 tháng 12. Vào ngày 26 tháng 11 tại khu vực quần đảo Gilbert, nó được ghi công đã đánh chìm tàu ngầm I-39 của Hải quân Nhật Bản, một chiếc thuộc lớp B1/I-15 có trọng lượng choán nước còn lớn hơn bản thân chiếc tàu khu trục, và có khả năng mang theo một thủy phi cơ trinh sát.

Trong khi bắn phá đảo Nauru vào ngày 8 tháng 12, Boyd bị hư hại bởi hỏa lực của một khẩu đội pháo phòng thủ duyên hải Nhật Bản trong một nhiệm vụ giải cứu nó chịu đựng tổn thất một sĩ quan và 11 thủy thủ thiệt mạng, cùng 8 người khác bị thương. [1] Nó phải quay về Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides để sửa chữa.

1944 Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất sửa chữa, Boyd đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 23 tháng 3 năm 1944. Nó tham gia cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 58 trong các hoạt động: đổ bộ lên Hollandia từ ngày 21 đến ngày 24 tháng 4 bắn phá khu vực Truk-Satawan-Ponape từ ngày 29 tháng 4 đến ngày 1 tháng 5 đổ bộ lên Saipan từ ngày 11 đến ngày 24 tháng 6 bắn phá Bonin lần thứ nhất trong các ngày 15-16 tháng 6 Trận chiến biển Philippine trong các ngày 19-20 tháng 6 bắn phá Bonin lần thứ hai vào ngày 24 tháng 6 bắn phá Bonin lần thứ ba trong các ngày 3-4 tháng 7 chiếm đóng Guam từ ngày 12 tháng 7 đến ngày 15 tháng 8 bắn phá Palau-Yap-Ulithi từ ngày 25 đến ngày 27 tháng 7 bắn phá Bonin lần thứ tư vào các ngày 4-5 tháng 8 chiếm phần Nam Palaus từ ngày 9 đến ngày 24 tháng 9 và đổ bộ lên Morotai vào ngày 15 tháng 9.

Sau đó Boyd gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 cho các cuộc không kích lên Okinawa vào ngày 10 tháng 10, lên Đài Loan và phía Bắc Luzon từ ngày 11 đến ngày 14 tháng 10, lên chính Luzon vào ngày 15 tháng 10 để chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Leyte. Sau khi tham gia trận Hải chiến vịnh Leyte trong các ngày 24 và 25 tháng 10, nó hộ tống các tàu sân bay cho các cuộc không kích tiếp theo lên Luzon vào các ngày 5 và 6 tháng 11, 13 và 14, 19 và 25 tháng 11.

1945 Sửa đổi

Từ ngày 31 tháng 12 năm 1944 đến ngày 22 tháng 1 năm 1945, Boyd phục vụ như một tàu hộ tống. Nó tham gia cuộc bắn phá Iwo Jima, rồi trong chính cuộc đổ bộ lên đảo này từ ngày 19 tháng 2 đến ngày 1 tháng 3. Nó đi đến ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 9 tháng 3, và làm nhiệm vụ bảo vệ tại đây cho đến ngày 30 tháng 6. Con tàu gia nhập trở lại Đệ Tam hạm đội cho các cuộc không kích lên chính quốc Nhật Bản từ ngày 10 tháng 7 đến ngày 7 tháng 8.

Boyd là một trong những con tàu quay trở về Hoa Kỳ đầu tiên sau khi Nhật Bản đầu hàng khi nó rời Okinawa vào ngày 7 tháng 9, và được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island từ ngày 25 tháng 9 đến ngày 28 tháng 11. Con tàu di chuyển đến San Diego, đến nơi vào ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 1947, nơi nó được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1947 và được đưa về lực lượng dự bị.

1950 - 1969 Sửa đổi

Boyd được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 24 tháng 11 năm 1950, và trình diện để phục vụ cùng Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương. Sau khi huấn luyện tại vùng bờ Tây, nó lên đường đi sang Triều Tiên vào ngày 28 tháng 5 năm 1951, hoạt động cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 77 tại đây và trong các cuộc tuần tra tại eo biển Đài Loan, trước khi quay trở về San Diego vào ngày 21 tháng 12 năm 1951. Nó lại rời San Diego vào ngày 12 tháng 7 năm 1952 cho lượt bố trí thứ hai tại Triều Tiên, phục vụ cho việc phong tỏa Wonsan và trong cuộc thao diễn đổ bộ ngoài khơi Kojo từ ngày 6 đến ngày 15 tháng 10. Chiếc tàu khu trục rờ vùng biển Triều Tiên vào cuối tháng 1 năm 1953 và về đến San Diego vào ngày 16 tháng 2. Sau khi kết thúc xung đột tại Triều Tiên, nó hoạt động dọc theo vùng bờ Tây, và còn được bố trí thêm ba lượt hoạt động khác tại Viễn Đông.

Phục vụ Hải quân Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ Sửa đổi

Boyd được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 1 tháng 10 năm 1969, rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân, rồi được chuyển cho Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ. Con tàu phục vụ cùng Hải quân Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ như là chiếc TCG Iskenderun (D-343). Nó ngừng hoạt động năm 1981 và bị tháo dỡ.

Boyd được tặng thưởng mười một Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II, và được tặng thêm năm Ngôi sao Chiến trận khác khi phục vụ tại Triều Tiên.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 544 USS Boyd embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 544 USS Boyd embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


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Product Description

USS Boyd DD 544

Westpac Cruise

1955 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Boyd DD 544 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Bangkok, Hong Kong, Subic Bay and Manila Philippines, Kaohsiung Formosa China, Okinawa Sasebo and Yokosuka Japan, Midway Island, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and San Francisco.
  • Crew Roster (Name Rank) Sorted by Hometown State
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 293 Photos on Approximately 50 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

    Be sure to add us to your !

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    “Across the Pacific” – Robert Mansur, Veteran Describes Service Aboard Destroyer in WWII

    Shortly after graduating from Jefferson City (Mo.) High School in 1939, Robert Mansur spent a year and a half studying at the former Jefferson City Junior College. It was his enrollment at the University of Missouri in 1941, however, that landed him in a program that not only allowed him to complete his degree, but also sent him across the Pacific with the U.S. Navy.

    “While I was studying at Columbia, I enlisted in the Navy’s V-7 program,” said Mansur, 94, Jefferson City. “The program allowed me to complete my college and then attend Navy midshipmen’s school upon graduation.”

    When asked why he volunteered to enlist in the Navy and not another branch of service, Mansur jokingly responded, “I figured it would have the cleanest living and I didn’t feel like digging foxholes.”

    Earning his bachelor’s degree in business administration in May 1943, he traveled to the U.S. Naval Reserve Midshipmen’s School at Columbia University in New York. It was here, Mansur said, that he underwent several weeks of specialized training to prepare for service as an officer aboard a ship.

    “I then received assignment to the USS Boyd—DD 544—in January 1944,” said Mansur. “It was a Fletcher-class destroyer that was stationed at Mare Island (Calif.) and was at the tail end of being repaired after it was shelled (by a Japanese shore battery) during a rescue mission near an island in the Pacific.”

    When reporting to the ship, the young sailor recalls meeting the ship’s skipper—Capt. Ulysses S. Grant Sharp—who would later became a four-star admiral and commander in chief of the United States Pacific Command during the Vietnam War.

    Jefferson City, Mo., veteran Robert Mansur served in the Pacific as an officer aboard the USS Boyd during World War II. After the war, he helped reorganize the JC Symphony Orchestra and played first chair flute for 46 years (Courtesy of Robert Mansur).

    “He was a very competent and hands-on leader,” said Mansur.

    Soon after his arrival, Mansur was assigned as the torpedo officer and signal officer. He was then sent to San Diego for two weeks of training at the torpedo school where he learned how to track targets and fire the underwater missiles designed to strike submarines.

    “The ship had two bays of torpedoes and they were located behind each of the stacks on the ship,” he said.

    As the veteran explained, repairs were soon completed and a week after returning from his training, Mansur was aboard the Boyd when it sailed for Pearl Harbor to join a task force comprised of several ships bound for operations in the Pacific.

    With unvarnished honesty, Mansur admits that the next 2-1/2 years he spent on board the Boyd were relatively lackluster despite the occasional kamikaze attacks with which the crew would have to contend.

    “At that time there really wasn’t much of a threat from submarines, so as the torpedo officer there really wasn’t a lot for me to do,” he said.

    The ship sailed thousands of miles of ocean and performed operations such as the beach landings during the Battle of Saipan, Battle of the Philippine Sea, invasion of Guam and the bombardment of Iwo Jima.

    “Toward the end of the war, we were assigned radar picket duty with two or three other destroyers in the waters between the fleet and Tokyo,” said Mansur. (Radar picket lines were a formation of several ships stationed between an enemy location and a fleet of vessels to increase radar detection range and, occasionally, to intercept enemy aircraft.)

    Robert Mansur served aboard a Fletcher-class destroyer, the USS Boyd, during World War II under the command of Capt. Ulysses S. Grant Sharp, who later became the four-star admiral commanding the United States Pacific Command during the Vietnam War (U.S. Navy photograph).

    “We were there to intercept kamikaze pilots trying to find the fleet,” he said. “On one occasion, they came en masse and while we were battling there was a total eclipse of the moon and everything went dark—we couldn’t see them and they couldn’t see us.” He added, “The skipper said to keep shooting whether or not we could see them.”

    The veteran notes that although several ships were damaged when struck by kamikaze planes, the USS Boyd was fortunate to avoid any further damage than that sustained earlier in the war.

    After the war, the ship was “deactivated” but went on to see service in the Korean War. Mansur remained in the Navy until March 1946 and returned to his hometown of Jefferson City, working several years for Oberman Manufacturing, Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company, the Missouri Public Service Commission and as a doorkeeper for the Missouri House of Representatives.

    He has also been active with the Jefferson City Symphony Orchestra and, in 1948, joined several local musicians in reorganizing the group following its disbandment after many of its members had been drafted during World War II. For 46 years, Mansur said, he played as first chair flute with the orchestra and also served as president, membership chairman and concert manager for the Community Concert Association.

    Robert Mansur maintains that although his military service may have been largely lacking in stimulation, his time with the Navy was punctuated with several moments he found to be both interesting and memorable.

    “Much of the time, as I’ve said, I wasn’t too busy because there just wasn’t a lot of call to shoot down planes with torpedoes—in fact, the only time I fired a torpedo was during a training exercise,” he said.

    “But there are many good memories such as the times we would drop anchor and have shore parties at different atolls whenever we weren’t involved in an engagement … or the times when they would show a movie on deck.”

    He lightheartedly added, “The food was excellent, too, but despite everything that happened—whether good or not—it really made me appreciate civilian life and I was ready to get back home.”


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